Have you ever wanted to participate in wildlife conservation? Now is chance: foster an indigenous animal of your choice and be a proud “foster parent” for a year.

This monthly/ annual fee will medicate, feed and house would help to protect South Africa’s indigenous wildlife species.

Through your donation you will actively participate in the ongoing conservation efforts and thereby aligning yourself with FreeMe’s rescue, rehabilitation  and release ethics.

To apply today, please download the necessary forms and return to us by email on info@freemeafrica.org.za

FreeMe – Debit Order Authorisation Form Sponsorship program

FreeMe – Sponsorship Application Form

 

You will receive the following benefits:

  • A foster-ship certificate
  • 3 digital images of the specific species
  • A species fact sheet
  • Electronic activity reports per year updating sponsor parents on rescues and releases at the centre

 

Wildlife Species Some Examples Monthly/Annual Fee
Avian Garden Birds, eg: doves, hadedas, loeriesWater Birds, eg: R100.00/month or R1,200.00/year
Avian SQ Birds of Prey, eg: owls, R500.00/month or R6,000.00/year
Reptiles  eg: tortoises, chameleons and snakes R210.00/month or R2,500.00/year
Small Mammals  eg: genets, meerkats, otters  R416.00/month or R5,000.00
 SQ on request

SQ – Special Cases

This category will be offered once-off as special cases are admitted.

 

SQ – Cages and Enclosures

This category is ideal for corporate donors and schools, who wish to participate in the variety of animals that can pass through an enclosure in a single year.  Enclosures are branded as requested.  For enquiries on this package, please contact us directly by email.

FreeMe Success Stories:

World first release of the rare black-footed cat (Felis nigripes), which came to FreeMe as hand-reared orphans. In collaboration with the scientific community they went through a carefully-monitored release program on the Ezemvelo Nature Reserve.

World first release of the rare black-footed cat (Felis nigripes), which came to FreeMe as hand-reared orphans. In collaboration with the scientific community they went through a carefully-monitored release program on the Ezemvelo Nature Reserve.

A family of Meerkats surveying their brand-new home in the wild

A family of Meerkats surveying their brand-new home in the wild

A honey badger (Mellivora capensis), found alongside his dead mother who had been hit by a car, was brought in for care. He was hand-raised for 5 months before going through a slow release program in the Tswalu Kalahari Reserve.

A honey badger (Mellivora capensis), found alongside his dead mother who had been hit by a car, was brought in for care. He was hand-raised for 5 months before going through a slow release program in the Tswalu Kalahari Reserve.